Tuesday, April 19, 2016

The importance of cohesion

"Come on, come on, let's stick together" - Bryan Ferry

There's more to PL/SQL programs than packages, but most of our code will live in packages. The PL/SQL Reference offers the following benefits of organising our code into packages:

Modularity - we encapsulate logically related components into an easy to understand structure.

Easier Application Design - we can start with the interface in the package specification and code the implementation later.

Hidden Implementation Details - the package body is private so we can prevent application users having direct access to certain functionality.

Added Functionality - we can share the state of Package public variables and cursors for the life of a session.

Better Performance - Oracle Database loads the whole package into memory the first time you invoke a package subprogram, which makes subsequent invocations of any other subprogram quicker. Also packages prevent cascading dependencies and unnecessary recompilation.

Grants - we can grant permission on a single package instead of a whole bunch of objects.

However, we can only realise these benefits if the packaged components belong together: in other words, if our package is cohesive.  

The ever reliable Wikipedia defines cohesion like this: "the degree to which the elements of a module belong together"; in other words how it's a measure of the strength of the relationship between components. It's common to think of cohesion as a binary state - either a package is cohesive or it isn't - but actually it's a spectrum. (Perhaps computer science should use  "cohesiveness" which is more expressi but cohesion it is.)

Cohesion

Cohesion owes its origin as a Comp Sci term to Stevens, Myers, and Constantine.  Back in the Seventies they used the terms "module" and "processing elements", but we're discussing PL/SQL so let's use Package and Procedure instead. They defined seven levels of cohesion, with each level being better - more usefully cohesive - than its predecessor.

Coincidental

The package comprises an arbitrary selection of procedures and functions which are not related in any way. This obviously seems like a daft thing to do, but most packages with "Utility" in their name fall into this category.

Logical

The package contains procedures which all belong to the same logical class of functions. For instance, we might have a package to collect all the procedures which act as endpoints for REST Data Services.

Temporal

The package consists of procedures which are executed at the same system event. So we might have a package of procedures executed when a user logs on - authentication, auditing, session initialisation - and similar package for tidying up when the user logs off. Other than the triggering event the packaged functions are unrelated to each other.

Procedural

The package consists of procedures which are executed as part of the same business event. For instance, in an auction application there are a set of actions to follow whenever a bid is made: compare to asking price, evaluate against existing maximum bid, update lot's status, update bidder's history, send an email to the bidder, send an email to the user who's been outbid, etc.

Communicational

The package contains procedures which share common inputs or outputs. For example a payroll package may have procedures to calculate base salary, overtime, sick pay, commission, bonuses and produce the overall remuneration for an employee.

Sequential

The package comprises procedures which are executed as a chain, so that the output of one procedure becomes the input for another procedure. A classic example of this is an ETL package with procedures for loading data into a staging area, validating and transforming the data, and then loading records into the target table(s).

Functional

The package comprises procedures which are focused on a single task. Not only are all the procedures strongly related to each other but they are fitted to user roles too. So procedures for power users are in a separate package from procedures for normal users. The Oracle built-in packages for Advanced Queuing are a good model of Functional cohesion.

How cohesive is cohesive enough?

The grades of cohesion, with Coincidental as the worst and Functional as the best, are guidelines. Not every package needs to have Functional cohesion. In a software architecture we will have modules at different levels. The higher modules will tend to be composed of calls to lower level modules. The low level modules are the concrete implementations and they should aspire to Sequential or Functional cohesion.

The higher level modules can be organised to other levels. For instance we might want to build packages around user roles - Sales, Production, HR, IT - because Procedural cohesion makes it easier for the UI teams to develop screens, especially if they need to skin them for various different technologies (desktop, web, mobile). Likewise we wouldn't want to have Temporally cohesive packages with concrete code for managing user logon or logoff. But there is a value in organising a package which bundles up all the low level calls into a single abstract call for use in schema level AFTER LOGON triggers.    

Cohesion is not an easily evaluated condition. We need cohesion with a purpose, a reason to stick those procedures together. It's not enough to say "this package is cohesive". We must take into consideration how cohesive the package needs to be: how will it be used? what is its relationships with the other packages?

Applying design principles such as Single Responsibility, Common Reuse, Common Closure and Interface Segregation can help us to build cohesive packages. Getting the balance right requires an understanding of the purpose of the package and its place within the overall software architecture.  

Part of the Designing PL/SQL Programs series

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